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What can we do to improve transportation in Salt Lake City?

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Transportation

Kate Lohnes said about 7 years ago:

403

Through the Sustainable City Dashboard project, Salt Lake City is sharing our plan to enhance the future of our community. We invite you to join the conversation by sharing your ideas, comments and criticisms with us. What is your vision for the future of Salt Lake City?

10 comments

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Nikki Parsons about 7 years ago

Trax/bus convenience...
Allow bus tokens to be used on TRAX.
Be kinder to cyclists. They are treated like criminals and don't have an adequate place to park their bikes. My husband and kids and I went on a cycling/TRAX trip once (I'll never do that again). We were split up and then the driver forced the door closed on one of my kids so we had to race back from the next stop to retrieve him.
One last idea... I'd love to see more sheltered bus stops. And since they are a place where neighbors naturally gather, I'd love to see these stops treated as parklets.
- And a book exchange to each bus and trax stop so people can read at one stop and on the bus/train then drop off their book at another stop.
- Use swings as seating. What adult or kid wouldn't love to swing while waiting?

 

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Nikki Parsons about 7 years ago

Crosswalk improvements...
I love the HAWK lights, but since the are not feasible everywhere, let's add bulbouts/neckdowns to every crosswalk, starting with crosswalks near elementary schools.
Signage and lines don't seem to be enough to grab the attention of every driver, so change the environment to encourage drivers to slow down and pay attention in these areas.
My first choice would be curb extensions since the shorten the distance the pedestrian must cross and be exposed to danger. They also turn radiused corners into 90 degree angles or bulbouts that force drivers to stop and look before turning right.
Adding in-pavement LED lighting, raised crosswalks, pervious surfaces, and attention grabbing colors/stripes would also help.

 
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Matt Miller over 5 years ago

I wish Peak Democracy had a 'like' button, or at least an agree/disagree. Because I do surely agree with this comment.

 

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Nikki Parsons about 7 years ago

Road diets...
The wider the road, the faster drivers will drive. You can't put a 30 mph speed limit on a 5 lane road and expect anything but failure. But 30 mph on a 2 lane feels perfect. So put these wide roads on a diet. There will be no congestion since many don't even have more than a few cars at any given time.
A good example is 800 South and 900 East. Drivers ride there brakes on 800 South (4/5 lanes) fighting the urge to go much faster. Then when they turn onto 900 East, easily hover around 25 - 30 mph... especially at ninth and ninth where the space has become a pedestrian Mecca with bulbouts, benches, and art.
I'd love to see these wide streets narrowed. Give up a lane on each side and replace it with wider sidewalks (for sidewalk cafes), wider parking strips (for trees and bus stop parklets), and bike lanes. Give up endless left-turn lanes for tree-filled medians with limited left-turn areas and limited parking lot entrances to decrease sidewalk danger. And add bulbouts to intersections to shorten pedestrian vulnerability distances.

 
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Matt Miller over 5 years ago

Well put.

 

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James Oslon about 7 years ago

A number of cities have incorporated the traffic light and crosswalk system I am recalling to you as a very workable improvement to the old method now in place. With all the inventions for traffic management being tried in the Wasatch Communities, it seems odd that this has been ignored for so long. I have mentioned it several times in our community meetings with little more than a appreciative grunt.
At intersections, in high pedestrian areas, all motor traffic is stopped while a walk light is lit to allow foot traffic to proceed directly across intersections, both ways, and best of all, kitty-corner. What a great safety idea for pedestrians and advantage of easy turns for drivers, not having to watch and wait for pedestrians to cross their path. Both foot traffic and motor traffic move much more efficiently and safely. I would suggest that a couple of council members be discharged to Denver for a couple of days for a "look-see" and/or contact the Denver folks for some info.
Incidentally, I left Denver in the 70's, but that system was in place then.

 

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Jeffrey Wood over 6 years ago

I had the exciting opportunity to live in Chicago for several years where I gave up my addiction to my automobile. Having live in Utah most of my life, I had adopted our Utah way of life. I was addicted to my motor vehicle. As you probably know, Chicago is a city where you don't need a car. Better yet, you don’t even need a train or bus schedule. I would wake up, get dressed, walk out to the street corner and the CTA would soon arrive. I was oblivious to the CTA schedule, the frequency of bus and rail cars was a luxury I would soon miss.

Utahans don't know what their missing! No oil changes, petroleum bills, blissful commutes reading a novel or catching up on sleep while on your way work. I hope someday Utah can offer the LUXURY of a mature rail transit system. Let me put things into perspective for you, live on 475 N. Redwood Road. I work at 3165 E. Millrock Drive from 9AM-to-6PM. In using the UTA TRIP PLANING tool, my commute would be 2.15 hours each way. 2.15 EACH WAY? Really? Not only is this time consuming, but it is impractical.

For example, Chicago ran several rail lines down the center of their freeway system (red line, blue line). The freeway revolves around transit areas and the center of the freeway is unused space. My perspective is limited, but this could be a practical solution. For now, I cannot see the practically of taking the UTA as it currently stands. Hypothetically, I would take the UTA if a rail system existed down I-215. I could jump on this rail at 600 North and exit at 3000 East, it would be a fast and convenient commute. 3000E has several office buildings, it would be a popular stop! I wish public transit had more authority and finances to obtain “rights of way” to achieve practical service.

So 2.15 hours each way taking UTA’s current system when driving takes 35 minutes?

Free rides, tokens, discounts WILL NOT motivate me to ride UTA. Conveniences will! If you could get my commute using UTA down to one hour each way, I just might consider it. Convenience, Convenience, Convenience is how you will win me and likely many others too!

 

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Matt Miller over 5 years ago

I want separate bicycle lanes, I want them everywhere, and I don't care what it does to traffic speeds. Take a lane off the whole of 3rd south and give me a continuous protected route from Downtown to University. The traffic volumes don't justify the pavement width, anyway. 100 South cars, 200 South for Streetcar, 300 South for bikes and 400 South for TRAX.

 

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Name not shown about 5 years ago

These are fairly specific to my neighborhood and are not in any specific order.
1. Late night trax from the airport. Last train should leave from the airport by 1:00am. As the last flights come in around midnight it makes the system more practical. Even if you had just one train every 30 minutes after midnight that would be great! I use the trax to the airport twice a week.
2. Keep the HIVE Pass. Me and my wife both have it and are very happy with it.
3. 21st South is in desperate need of bike lanes from 23rd East to the heart of Sugar House and eventually extending all the way to Central Pointe.
4 A ski bus that would go from somewhere in Sugar House direct to the mouth of Big/Little Cottonwood Canyon. Currently we drive from approx 21South and 21East to the mouth of Big Cottonwood then take the ski bus. Not bad, but I think this could be improved.
5. More HAWK signals! May I suggest 21South and 19East. Just try crossing 21South safely without it!
6. Extend the S line up 21South.

 

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Name not shown over 4 years ago

Crosswalks at bus stops are confusing to drivers. Any way to separate these by 15 feet or so? It gets drivers in the habit of ignoring crosswalks when people are standing next to them, waiting for a bus.

 

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