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Barry Rands inside Neighborhood 12 July 22, 2020, 8:46 PM

Please share your feedback on the Public Review Draft: Climate Action Plan for Community Recovery to achieve the community's Climate Action Goals.
Though I applaud the City's effort to update the Climate Action Plan to achieve carbon neutrality by 2035, I was disappointed to see that the plan admits that it will be unable to reach that goal, leaving an emissions gap of almost 30%. This primarily due to the modesty of the recommended policies and actions. An aggressive carbon neutrality goal requires aggressive action and the City of San Luis Obispo can do much better than what is envisioned in this plan.

Though I did not read the entire report, I did read the section on Pillar 4, which is in my realm of expertise, and found several areas where more aggressive measures can be taken. Considering that the transportation sector is the major source of GHG emissions in SLO, this Pillar needs to and can be greatly improved.

1. The “Mobility as Service” talks about facilitating access to transit and bike sharing services, but makes no mention of the potential for EV car sharing. Programs such as BlueLA https://www.bluela.com/ are making it possible for people of all income levels to travel in a ZEV. Considering that a large segment of the population will never ride bikes and public transit can rarely cover the “last mile”, public EV sharing program will fill an important niche in SLO.
2. Ride sharing services are here to stay and are very popular. They already have the “Mobility as Service” element solved. But they lack a mandate to operate carbon-free. LA is considering mandating this. The State is also considering it. San Luis Obispo should, too, and not wait for the State to act.
3. The Active Transportation Plan is great and should be implemented immediately as suggested. But it is not as aggressive as it could be. We need to prioritize the creation of an entire network of streets closed to through motor vehicle traffic so that bikes and pedestrians can move freely. Bike paths and protected bike lanes are expensive to build (though I really like the proposed “quick-build” strategy for the short-term) and will likely become congested with pedestrians, dog walkers, baby strollers, kids on training wheels, and such, making it difficult for bike commuters to use those routes. This will be especially true for e-bike riders, who travel at speeds in excess of 20 mph. An entire street, however, can accommodate walkers and riders of all speeds and abilities. The ATP’s mandate is to get more people of all ages on bikes and protected bike lanes and such will do that. But the Climate Action Plan needs to get working people out of cars and onto bikes for their daily commute and running errands. The difference in target population is significant and will impact the types of infrastructure to be prioritized.
4. The Micro-mobility program should have been implemented long ago. So many other cities have them….But what we need to complement the bikeshare program is a fleet of bicycle taxis. As mentioned before, many people will not get on a bike, but would be willing to ride in a bike taxi. There is a small pedicab service https://www.slopedicab.com/ in SLO, and I understand that they are willing to expand if the City would help out.
5. Section 3 should mention the need for Level 3 (fast-charging) EV charging stations in downtown SLO parking garages or City managed parking lots. Look at how busy the Tesla fast charging station is at the Madonna Inn. We need the equivalent in downtown SLO for all EVs. There are currently no Level 3 chargers near downtown, a huge lost opportunity to attract long distance EV travelers to make a stop downtown.
6. Section 6 calls for an electric mobility plan. This is long overdue. I would love to help the City develop this.
7. Many if not all of the Case Studies references are in cities that do not have as aggressive goals as we do. The CAP should reference some of the European cities that have very aggressive climate action plans and specifically aggressive EV programs such as those in Norway.

I wish I had taken the time to read and comment on the entire plan, but hope that the spirit of these comments on Pillar 4 can be applied to the whole plan. As Hamilton said, this is our shot, let’s not waste it!

Isabella Hoffmann inside Neighborhood 8 July 22, 2020, 8:43 PM

Please share your feedback on the Public Review Draft: Climate Action Plan for Community Recovery to achieve the community's Climate Action Goals.
San Luis Obispo's Climate Action Plan for Community Recovery has done an excellent job of using science to properly understand the climate crisis and the importance of obtaining carbon neutrality by 2035. While I am disappointed that this plan does not have any goals to decrease single use plastic and increase recycling of plastics other than #1 and #2, I hope to see that in the future. As an incoming senior in high school planning on majoring in environmental science, I'm extremely satisfied of the necessary steps needed to reach carbon neutrality by 2035.

Dean Arrighi inside Neighborhood 7 July 21, 2020, 3:43 PM

Please share your feedback on the Public Review Draft: Climate Action Plan for Community Recovery to achieve the community's Climate Action Goals.
Active Transportation Plan (Page 46) - One high priority bicycle project should be creating a network of bike routes to allow high school students to ride bicycles to and from school. One example would be to install a protected bike route on Orcutt Rd and Johnson Ave to the school. A 2-way bike lane could be located on the westbound side of Johnson Ave by eliminating the car parking spaces on that side. A good bike route network could reduce parents driving their kids to and from the high school, thereby reducing traffic and air pollution.

Solid Waste Plan (Page 65) - The plan should include installation of recycling containers within all City urban parks. There are parks that have no way for me to recycle a bottle or can. In order to avoid/minimize the recycle waste stream being contaminated with non-recyclable trash, I suggest the recycling container lids be able to accept only round soda cans and bottles no more than quart size.

Urban Forest Master Plan (Page 70) - I have seen examples of a group of large trees cut down, leaving an area bare with no tree or other vegetative re-planting. This practice must end. It not only reduces the City's natural atmospheric carbon sink, but creates a visual blight on our neighborhoods. One current example is a group of about 12 large eucalyptus trees that were removed at least 3 months ago. The location is between the parking lot and creek next to the condo development at the end of Southwood, across from the YMCA. Where once there were big beautiful trees along the creek, there are now ugly tree stumps and barren land. I suggest the City adopt the following policy: Before any tree removal project is approved by the City, the project proponent must submit a written plan to replace the removed trees (either at the same location or elsewhere) and restore the affected area with new plantings or development as appropriate. The new tree replanting work must begin within 2 months of the date of final tree removal. The proponent (City or private sector) must show proof of being able to execute the start of replanting work by the 2 month deadline. All the work should be lined up and ready to go from the project start to finish. Also, ALL tree stumps left in place anywhere should be no more than 1 foot in height from grade to minimize their ugly appearance and avoid any potential safety hazard.
Thanx,
Dean Arrighi

Ray Weymann outside Neighborhoods July 17, 2020, 2:28 PM

Please share your feedback on the Public Review Draft: Climate Action Plan for Community Recovery to achieve the community's Climate Action Goals.
I strongly support the SLO Climate action plan. Joining the MBCP group is a win-win for all as are the proposals for waste recovery, soil carbon capture and tree planting. Others will take longer to phase in and can be implemented as the economy recovers. Some have complained about China and India, but the U.S. per capita of emissions is the highest of any major country. SLO can be a model for emissions reduction while creating jobs and improving the quality of life. But it was also good to see that some of their proposals have already been successfully implemented in both red state and blue state towns.

Name not shown inside Neighborhood 2 July 16, 2020, 7:28 PM

What are your highest priorities related to City services, maintenance and infrastructure?
Support community organizations and non-profits that serve the community's most vulnerable, Preserve open space and natural areas , Address homelessness, Protect creeks from pollution, Requiring all funds used locally to benefit the community, Programs that support economic recovery, Keep public areas safe and clean, Prepare for wildfires and other natural disasters, Help ensure children have safe places to play, Protecting long-term fiscal stability, Maintain public safety, fire and emergency response, Repair streets and potholes

Madison Gilmartin inside Neighborhood 6 July 16, 2020, 7:24 PM

What are your highest priorities related to City services, maintenance and infrastructure?
Prepare for wildfires and other natural disasters, Preserve open space and natural areas , Support community organizations and non-profits that serve the community's most vulnerable, Programs that support economic recovery, Requiring all funds used locally to benefit the community, Maintain public safety, fire and emergency response, Address homelessness, Protect creeks from pollution, Protecting long-term fiscal stability, Keep public areas safe and clean, Help ensure children have safe places to play, Repair streets and potholes

Julia Franco inside Neighborhood 6 July 15, 2020, 5:56 PM

Please share your feedback on the Public Review Draft: Climate Action Plan for Community Recovery to achieve the community's Climate Action Goals.
I am glad that the economy is recovering and I am also glad that hopefully I can go back to School in person at Cuesta College.


Name not shown inside Neighborhood 4 July 13, 2020, 3:06 PM

What are your highest priorities related to City services, maintenance and infrastructure?
Programs that support economic recovery, Address homelessness, Protecting long-term fiscal stability, Requiring all funds used locally to benefit the community, Preserve open space and natural areas , Repair streets and potholes, Protect creeks from pollution, Help ensure children have safe places to play, Maintain public safety, fire and emergency response, Prepare for wildfires and other natural disasters, Keep public areas safe and clean, Support community organizations and non-profits that serve the community's most vulnerable


Are there other high priorities related to City services, maintenance and infrastructure not listed in Question 1?
Municipal Fiber/Internet

Name not shown inside Neighborhood 3 July 11, 2020, 10:39 AM

What are your highest priorities related to City services, maintenance and infrastructure?
Preserve open space and natural areas , Help ensure children have safe places to play, Protect creeks from pollution, Address homelessness, Keep public areas safe and clean, Maintain public safety, fire and emergency response, Repair streets and potholes, Support community organizations and non-profits that serve the community's most vulnerable, Prepare for wildfires and other natural disasters

Name not shown inside Neighborhood 1 July 11, 2020, 10:15 AM

What are your highest priorities related to City services, maintenance and infrastructure?
Preserve open space and natural areas , Protect creeks from pollution, Repair streets and potholes, Keep public areas safe and clean, Requiring all funds used locally to benefit the community, Protecting long-term fiscal stability, Maintain public safety, fire and emergency response, Support community organizations and non-profits that serve the community's most vulnerable, Help ensure children have safe places to play, Address homelessness, Prepare for wildfires and other natural disasters, Programs that support economic recovery


Are there other high priorities related to City services, maintenance and infrastructure not listed in Question 1?
A more caring city and a council that honors needs of ALL residents not just their buddies., More openness in city's receiving and providing information to us, Get a new city attorney who cares more about implementing Brown Act intent and less about covering up council's abuse of BA