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Check out some recent Registered Statements from forum participants

Matthew Irons inside Neighborhood 6 June 6, 2022, 9:04 PM

Prior to this survey, did you know about the City's program supporting all-electric new buildings? No
As noted above, the City is updating its program to potentially require all-electric new buildings starting in 2023. Do you have any concerns about this update and do you have any recommendations for how to address these concerns? I have no major concerns as I feel this is a crucial proposal.
What opportunities do you see coming from this policy? Dramatic move away from reliance on carbon intensive energy sources.
What could the City do to ensure the program is successful?
Add public notices in visible places (parks, commercial areas)

Name not available inside Neighborhood 7 June 6, 2022, 2:14 PM

Prior to this survey, did you know about the City's program supporting all-electric new buildings? Yes
As noted above, the City is updating its program to potentially require all-electric new buildings starting in 2023. Do you have any concerns about this update and do you have any recommendations for how to address these concerns? With more electric buildings, we also need more energy grid security and rapid decarbonization of the grid. There needs to be as much attention on this as there is for building electrification. I don't know enough about housing, but I am concerned that this could potentially slow development of housing which we very much need in SLO. Additionally, I'm concerned that these homes would be more expensive and would only attract those who could pay more, further pushing vulnerable populations to live in older buildings that are less safe.
What opportunities do you see coming from this policy? I am supportive of decarbonizing our buildings, and it may provide further opportunities to focus on grid decarbonization and electrifying existing buildings. Healthier indoor air quality if not relying on natural gas for stoves.
What could the City do to ensure the program is successful?
Focus on affordability and protecting vulnerable populations first; prioritizing health with decarbonization

Name not available inside Neighborhood 5 June 2, 2022, 4:02 PM

Good Afternoon,

I hope your day is going well.

I would like to provide my public comments-
Rental subsidy should cover any rental expense that exceeds 30% of individuals net income. Recommendation is to have participates report income quarterly (Every 3 months) for rental Subsidy renewal. Individuals can report monthly if they need too. Classify low-income as $0- SLO County Median income. Classify Moderate-income SLO County Median Income to $144,000 (SLO County middle class high end) Mortgages should not exceed 30% rule. This should help support SLO in being more family friendly, because a Single family Household can not compete in this rental market.
Best Regards,
Valerie Butterbredt

Name not available outside Neighborhoods June 2, 2022, 9:46 AM

Prior to this survey, did you know about the City's program supporting all-electric new buildings? Somewhat
As noted above, the City is updating its program to potentially require all-electric new buildings starting in 2023. Do you have any concerns about this update and do you have any recommendations for how to address these concerns? I can imagine that a large number of new, all-electric buildings would increase local demand for electricity. Local utilities should plan for this increase through adopting more solar-friendly policies and investing in energy storage.
What opportunities do you see coming from this policy? There are several opportunities: new buildings without gas infrastructure are less expensive and avoid the emissions associated with gas water heaters, gas heaters and gas stoves. Given recent studies on the emissions of gas stoves *even when they are off*, this is vital. If solar is required for all new buildings, there will be demand for local workers to install panels. Also a opportunity.
What could the City do to ensure the program is successful?
Coordinate with local builders to get them on board, by discussing the benefits they will see in construction. Work with utilities to get ahead of increased demand and the need for clean energy storage.

Name not available inside Neighborhood 7 June 1, 2022, 9:45 PM

Prior to this survey, did you know about the City's program supporting all-electric new buildings? Yes
As noted above, the City is updating its program to potentially require all-electric new buildings starting in 2023. Do you have any concerns about this update and do you have any recommendations for how to address these concerns? Removing cost efficient options is grossly illogical.
What opportunities do you see coming from this policy? PG&E will become an energy monopoly and will make lot more money… and then raise their prices and we won’t be able to do anything.
What could the City do to ensure the program is successful?
STOP IT.

Erik Ramberg inside Neighborhood 1 June 1, 2022, 8:18 PM

Prior to this survey, did you know about the City's program supporting all-electric new buildings? Yes
As noted above, the City is updating its program to potentially require all-electric new buildings starting in 2023. Do you have any concerns about this update and do you have any recommendations for how to address these concerns? I do not support blanket restrictions on the use of natural gas for new residential buildings. A much better policy is to require sufficient hood ventilation for stoves with required make-up air and strict leakage inspections. Induction is great for some cooking but not every type of cooking. Other gas appliances have more equivalent electric counterparts than gas vs electric stoves
What opportunities do you see coming from this policy? With the adjustments above, SLO would demonstrate a progressive approach to climate leadership
What could the City do to ensure the program is successful?
The changes outlined above and community education

Name not available inside Neighborhood 8 June 1, 2022, 11:49 AM

Prior to this survey, did you know about the City's program supporting all-electric new buildings? Somewhat
As noted above, the City is updating its program to potentially require all-electric new buildings starting in 2023. Do you have any concerns about this update and do you have any recommendations for how to address these concerns? The City should not adopt a policy requiring new buildings to be all-electric.

The decision should be left to the developer based on:
-Market Demand
-Economics
-Their Own Values

The City doesn't need to adopt a policy requiring new buildings to be all-electric because the shift is already beginning to happen naturally.
What opportunities do you see coming from this policy? The City's climate goals will be achieved without requiring new buildings to be all-electric.

Some developers already voluntarily choose to build all-electric because it aligns with their values and makes sense to them from a financial standpoint.
What could the City do to ensure the program is successful?
The City will ultimately be successful in reaching our adopted climate goals (potentially not on the aggressive timeline we have adopted) without adopting a new policy because a shift towards all-electric buildings is already underway due to other factors beyond the control of the City.

Name not shown inside Neighborhood 11 June 1, 2022, 6:39 AM

Prior to this survey, did you know about the City's program supporting all-electric new buildings? Yes
As noted above, the City is updating its program to potentially require all-electric new buildings starting in 2023. Do you have any concerns about this update and do you have any recommendations for how to address these concerns? Terrible idea.. gas is cheaper .
You will hurt poor families.
Gas is cheaper for heating.
What opportunities do you see coming from this policy? None.. pg and e has the highest prices for electricity.. monterey power is about the same and it was supposed to lower prices.. but it didnt!! Its a monopoly and now you will give them even more room to raise rates.
Rolling blackouts and a strained power grid is a fact. Adding all electric will add to the problem
What could the City do to ensure the program is successful?
No do it.. itsva bad policy

Name not available inside Neighborhood 6 May 31, 2022, 6:02 PM

Prior to this survey, did you know about the City's program supporting all-electric new buildings? Somewhat
As noted above, the City is updating its program to potentially require all-electric new buildings starting in 2023. Do you have any concerns about this update and do you have any recommendations for how to address these concerns? I think this is great! This is totally possible, I think the trick is education of the community and industry. Building industry professionals like In Balance and 3CE have already been doing great educational sessions that should continue with this effort.
What opportunities do you see coming from this policy? I see a path towards Net Zero Energy and the potential for electric retrofits of existing structures in the future. As California moves rapidly towards a carbon-free grid, this moves us towards a Net Zero Carbon community
What could the City do to ensure the program is successful?
Provide educational sessions for industry and community members, spotlight recent successful all-electric buildings in the city

Name not shown inside Neighborhood 1 May 29, 2022, 12:50 PM

I agree with the statement written on 05/28/2022 at 7:52PM, "The permanent placement of parklets is unfair..." As taxpayers in the county of SLO, we have funded the construction and maintenance of the streets and sidewalks for years for the use of transportation and parking, not for parklets (which benefit the restaurants/bars and not other retail businesses). The City Council's consideration of transitioning to a permanent parklet program should be left up to the local tax paying citizens through a vote by ballet not unilaterally imposed upon us. The inequity of the idea of permanent parklets is indeed stunning. To be fair, every downtown business owner should be given the opportunity to set up a parklet, not just restaurants/bars. And, it is unfair to ask downtown SLO's citizens/patrons to continue to endure the logistical headaches the parklets present when attempting to navigate SLO's streets and sidewalks. This idea represents a grand money generating proposition for the City (as pointed out in the 05/28/2022 7:52PM statement). The losers will be: the citizens/patrons of downtown SLO who are accustomed to convenient street parking spaces and not the out-of-the-way and previously underused parking structures; the businesses that are not restaurants and bars; the handicapped, injured or older individuals, who cannot find convenient street parking because it is occupied by parklets. How will parklets present opportunities for non-profit and community organizations when local citizens will be discouraged from driving to downtown SLO because of the safe traffic and parking impediments the parklets present?