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How do you experience and prepare for hazards and what do you think we should do to increase community resilience?

198 registered responses


Have you experienced any of the following hazards in Ann Arbor?

Response Percent Response Count
Dam Failure 0.5% 1
Drought 15.4% 30
Earthquake 5.1% 10
Extreme Cold/Wind Chill 62.1% 121
Extreme Heat 36.9% 72
Flood – House 26.2% 51
Flood – Street 28.2% 55
Flood – Yard 25.6% 50
Fog 51.3% 100
Hail 56.4% 110
Invasive Species 44.6% 87
Lightning 49.2% 96
Precipitation 63.1% 123
Severe Winter Weather 76.9% 150
Severe Wind 72.3% 141
Tornado 8.2% 16
Civil Disturbances 8.2% 16
Cyber-attacks 8.7% 17
Drinking Water Contamination 17.9% 35
Hazardous Materials 8.2% 16
Petroleum and Natural Gas Pipeline Accidents 2.6% 5
Power Outages 90.3% 176
Public Health Emergencies 57.4% 112
Structure Fires 4.1% 8
Terrorism and Similar Criminal Activities 1.5% 3

How concerned are you about the following hazards?

Dam Failure
Response Percent Response Count
Not at all 62.2% 122
Somewhat 30.6% 60
Very 3.6% 7
Drought
Response Percent Response Count
Not at all 48.5% 95
Somewhat 40.3% 79
Very 8.7% 17
Earthquake
Response Percent Response Count
Not at all 86.2% 169
Somewhat 9.7% 19
Extreme Cold/Wind Chill
Response Percent Response Count
Not at all 17.3% 34
Somewhat 61.7% 121
Very 19.9% 39
Extreme Heat
Response Percent Response Count
Not at all 20.4% 40
Somewhat 53.1% 104
Very 24.5% 48
Flood – House
Response Percent Response Count
Not at all 35.2% 69
Somewhat 42.3% 83
Very 18.9% 37
Flood – Street
Response Percent Response Count
Not at all 37.2% 73
Somewhat 42.3% 83
Very 16.3% 32
Flood – Yard
Response Percent Response Count
Not at all 41.8% 82
Somewhat 38.8% 76
Very 15.3% 30
Fog
Response Percent Response Count
Not at all 74.0% 145
Somewhat 17.9% 35
Very 3.1% 6
Hail
Response Percent Response Count
Not at all 49.0% 96
Somewhat 43.9% 86
Very 3.1% 6
Invasive Species
Response Percent Response Count
Not at all 22.4% 44
Somewhat 51.5% 101
Very 21.4% 42
Lightning
Response Percent Response Count
Not at all 40.8% 80
Somewhat 48.5% 95
Very 7.1% 14
Precipitation
Response Percent Response Count
Not at all 41.8% 82
Somewhat 44.4% 87
Very 10.2% 20
Severe Winter Weather
Response Percent Response Count
Not at all 16.3% 32
Somewhat 59.7% 117
Very 23.0% 45
Severe Wind
Response Percent Response Count
Not at all 14.8% 29
Somewhat 53.6% 105
Very 30.6% 60
Tornado
Response Percent Response Count
Not at all 24.5% 48
Somewhat 56.6% 111
Very 14.8% 29
Civil Disturbances
Response Percent Response Count
Not at all 46.4% 91
Somewhat 40.3% 79
Very 6.6% 13
Cyber-attacks
Response Percent Response Count
Not at all 24.0% 47
Somewhat 57.1% 112
Very 15.3% 30
Drinking Water Contamination
Response Percent Response Count
Not at all 13.3% 26
Somewhat 49.5% 97
Very 35.2% 69
Hazardous Materials
Response Percent Response Count
Not at all 32.1% 63
Somewhat 48.5% 95
Very 14.8% 29
Nuclear Power Incidents
Response Percent Response Count
Not at all 66.8% 131
Somewhat 23.0% 45
Very 6.1% 12
Petroleum and Natural Gas Pipeline Accidents
Response Percent Response Count
Not at all 37.8% 74
Somewhat 39.3% 77
Very 19.4% 38
Power Outages
Response Percent Response Count
Not at all 6.6% 13
Somewhat 41.8% 82
Very 49.0% 96
Public Health Emergencies
Response Percent Response Count
Not at all 11.7% 23
Somewhat 49.0% 96
Very 37.2% 73
Structure Fires
Response Percent Response Count
Not at all 33.2% 65
Somewhat 53.1% 104
Very 11.2% 22
Terrorism and Similar Criminal Activities
Response Percent Response Count
Not at all 46.4% 91
Somewhat 40.3% 79
Very 8.2% 16

Please rank the following climate-related impacts in terms of the level of threat you think they pose to Ann Arbor

Are there other climate-related impacts that you think threaten Ann Arbor? If so, please describe.

Answered
64
Skipped
134

Is your home or business located in a floodplain?

Response Percent Response Count
Yes 3.6% 7
No 73.8% 144
Don't Know 22.6% 44

Is your property about the same, less, or more prone to flooding now than it was 5 years ago?

Response Percent Response Count
More 18.3% 36
Less 3.0% 6
About the same 50.8% 100
N/A (haven’t lived in my home for 5+ years) 19.3% 38
Don’t Know 8.6% 17

Do you feel you and/or your family is prepared for emergencies or disasters?

Response Percent Response Count
Yes 13.2% 26
Somewhat 69.0% 136
No 16.2% 32
Don't Know 1.5% 3

What steps have you taken to prepare for the types of emergencies and disasters that might occur in our community?

Response Percent Response Count
Collected preparedness information 50.9% 88
Attended meetings dealing with emergency preparedness 8.1% 14
Prepared and discussed an emergency plan 35.8% 62
Taken special training (First Aid, CPR, CERT, etc.) 40.5% 70
Signed up to receive A2 Emergency Alerts 64.7% 112
Assembled an emergency kit 52.6% 91
Developed a neighborhood resilience strategy 1.2% 2
Purchased flood insurance 6.9% 12
Other 13.9% 24

Do you feel that the City of Ann Arbor has effectively helped the community prepare for emergencies or disasters?

Response Percent Response Count
Yes 3.6% 7
Somewhat 39.6% 78
No 28.4% 56
Don't Know 28.4% 56

A number of citywide activities can reduce our risk from hazards. In general, these activities fall into one of the following seven broad categories. Please rank the categories in order of importance with 1 being the most important.

Average priorities over 198 responses
  1. Administrative or regulatory actions that influence the way land is developed and buildings are built.  Examples include planning and zoning, building codes, open space preservation, and floodplain regulations.

    Prevention
  2. Actions that protect people and property during and immediately after a hazard event.  Examples include warning systems, evacuation planning, emergency response training, and protection of critical emergency facilities or systems.

    Emergency Services
  3. Actions to inform citizens about hazards and the techniques they can use to protect themselves and their property.  Examples include outreach projects, school education programs, library materials and demonstration events.

    Public Education and Awareness
  4. Actions that, in addition to minimizing hazard losses, also preserve or restore the functions of natural systems.  Examples include: floodplain protection, habitat preservation, slope stabilization, riparian buffers, and forest management.

    Natural Resource Protection
  5. Actions intended to lessen the impact of a hazard by modifying the natural progression of the hazard.  Examples include dams, levees, detention/retention basins, channel modification, retaining walls and storm sewers.

    Structural Projects
  6. Actions that help residents build and maintain relationships with each other (especially neighbors), create shared plans, and develop shared resources to jointly prepare for, withstand, and recover from hazards.

    Social Cohesion Projects
  7. Actions that involve the modification of existing buildings to protect them from a hazard or removal from the hazard area.  Examples include acquisition, relocation, elevation, structural retrofits, and storm shutters.

    Property Protection

Please indicate which method(s) you prefer to receive preparedness information.

Response Percent Response Count
Fact sheet/brochure 52.0% 102
Public workshops/meetings 28.1% 55
Radio 20.4% 40
Television 5.1% 10
Newspaper 12.8% 25
Internet (website, email, etc.) 87.2% 171
Social Media (Facebook, Twitter, etc.) 24.5% 48
Mailer (e.g., in water or tax bill) 53.1% 104
Other 7.7% 15

Please indicate which method(s) you prefer to receive ongoing emergency/disaster information.

Response Percent Response Count
Radio 41.3% 81
Television 16.3% 32
Newspaper 7.7% 15
Internet (website, email, etc.) 82.7% 162
Notification services (A2 Emergency Alerts) 78.1% 153
Social media (Facebook, Twitter, etc.) 25.5% 50
Mailer (e.g., in water or tax bill) 26.5% 52
Other 6.1% 12

What two actions do you think are the most important for the City to take to increase resilience to hazards, including climate-related hazards?

Answered
135
Skipped
63

Please provide any additional feedback, comments, thoughts, or suggestions:

Answered
50
Skipped
148
Jerry Wang inside ward 5
May 1, 2022, 6:28 PM
  • Have you experienced any of the following hazards in Ann Arbor?
    • Extreme Cold/Wind Chill
    • Precipitation
    • Severe Winter Weather
    • Power Outages
  • How concerned are you about the following hazards?
    • Dam Failure - Not at all
    • Drought - Not at all
    • Earthquake - Not at all
    • Extreme Cold/Wind Chill - Somewhat
    • Extreme Heat - Somewhat
    • Flood – House - Not at all
    • Flood – Street - Not at all
    • Flood – Yard - Not at all
    • Fog - Not at all
    • Hail - Not at all
    • Invasive Species - Not at all
    • Lightning - Not at all
    • Precipitation - Not at all
    • Severe Winter Weather - Somewhat
    • Severe Wind - Not at all
    • Tornado - Not at all
    • Civil Disturbances - Not at all
    • Cyber-attacks - Not at all
    • Drinking Water Contamination - Not at all
    • Hazardous Materials - Not at all
    • Nuclear Power Incidents - Not at all
    • Petroleum and Natural Gas Pipeline Accidents - Not at all
    • Power Outages - Very
    • Public Health Emergencies - Not at all
    • Structure Fires - Not at all
    • Terrorism and Similar Criminal Activities - Not at all
  • Please rank the following climate-related impacts in terms of the level of threat you think they pose to Ann Arbor
    1. frequent winter storms

      More extreme and more frequent winter storm events (including ice storms)
    2. Increased heat wave intensity and frequency

      Increased heat wave intensity and frequency
    3. Reduced air quality

      Reduced air quality
    4. frequent rainfall

      More extreme and more frequent rainfall events (more frequent flooding)
    5. Habitat disruption

      Habitat disruption
    6. frequent thunderstorm

      More extreme and more frequent thunderstorm storm events (including tornadoes)
    7. loss

      Loss and change of vegetation (including trees)
    8. In-migration

      In-migration of people to the area from areas more severely impacted by climate change
  • Are there other climate-related impacts that you think threaten Ann Arbor? If so, please describe.
    No response.
  • Is your home or business located in a floodplain?
    • Don't Know
  • Is your property about the same, less, or more prone to flooding now than it was 5 years ago?
    • Don’t Know
  • Do you feel you and/or your family is prepared for emergencies or disasters?
    • Somewhat
  • What steps have you taken to prepare for the types of emergencies and disasters that might occur in our community?
    No response.
  • Do you feel that the City of Ann Arbor has effectively helped the community prepare for emergencies or disasters?
    • No
  • A number of citywide activities can reduce our risk from hazards. In general, these activities fall into one of the following seven broad categories. Please rank the categories in order of importance with 1 being the most important.
    1. Actions to inform citizens about hazards and the techniques they can use to protect themselves and their property.  Examples include outreach projects, school education programs, library materials and demonstration events.

      Public Education and Awareness
    2. Administrative or regulatory actions that influence the way land is developed and buildings are built.  Examples include planning and zoning, building codes, open space preservation, and floodplain regulations.

      Prevention
    3. Actions that involve the modification of existing buildings to protect them from a hazard or removal from the hazard area.  Examples include acquisition, relocation, elevation, structural retrofits, and storm shutters.

      Property Protection
    4. Actions that, in addition to minimizing hazard losses, also preserve or restore the functions of natural systems.  Examples include: floodplain protection, habitat preservation, slope stabilization, riparian buffers, and forest management.

      Natural Resource Protection
    5. Actions that protect people and property during and immediately after a hazard event.  Examples include warning systems, evacuation planning, emergency response training, and protection of critical emergency facilities or systems.

      Emergency Services
    6. Actions intended to lessen the impact of a hazard by modifying the natural progression of the hazard.  Examples include dams, levees, detention/retention basins, channel modification, retaining walls and storm sewers.

      Structural Projects
    7. Actions that help residents build and maintain relationships with each other (especially neighbors), create shared plans, and develop shared resources to jointly prepare for, withstand, and recover from hazards.

      Social Cohesion Projects
  • Please indicate which method(s) you prefer to receive preparedness information.
    • Internet (website, email, etc.)
    • Social Media (Facebook, Twitter, etc.)
    • Other - Text Messages via phone
  • Please indicate which method(s) you prefer to receive ongoing emergency/disaster information.
    • Internet (website, email, etc.)
    • Notification services (A2 Emergency Alerts)
    • Social media (Facebook, Twitter, etc.)
    • Other - Text Message via phone
  • What two actions do you think are the most important for the City to take to increase resilience to hazards, including climate-related hazards?

    Prevent any and all power outages

  • Please provide any additional feedback, comments, thoughts, or suggestions:
    No response.
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HAZARD ASSESSMENT


Not at all
Somewhat
Very
Dam Failure
Drought
Earthquake
Extreme Cold/Wind Chill
Extreme Heat
Flood – House
Flood – Street
Flood – Yard
Fog
Hail
Invasive Species
Lightning
Precipitation
Severe Winter Weather
Severe Wind
Tornado
Civil Disturbances
Cyber-attacks
Drinking Water Contamination
Hazardous Materials
Nuclear Power Incidents
Petroleum and Natural Gas Pipeline Accidents
Power Outages
Public Health Emergencies
Structure Fires
Terrorism and Similar Criminal Activities

Climate change has and will continue to amplify the impact of local hazards. As a result, the City of Ann Arbor adopted a Climate Emergency Declaration in 2019 and has since been committed to meeting the goals outlined in the City’s A2ZERO Carbon Neutrality Plan.


Item Up Down Remove
Item Up Down Remove

frequent thunderstorm

loss

frequent winter storms

Reduced air quality

Habitat disruption

In-migration

frequent rainfall

Increased heat wave intensity and frequency


FLOOD HAZARD INFORMATION


PREPAREDNESS


The City of Ann Arbor’s A2 Emergency Alert system is used to notify residents of emergency situations that may require them to take action. You can register to receive these alerts via phone, text, and email. To register, visit www.washtenaw.org/alerts


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Item Up Down Remove

Actions that protect people and property during and immediately after a hazard event.  Examples include warning systems, evacuation planning, emergency response training, and protection of critical emergency facilities or systems.

Actions that, in addition to minimizing hazard losses, also preserve or restore the functions of natural systems.  Examples include: floodplain protection, habitat preservation, slope stabilization, riparian buffers, and forest management.

Actions to inform citizens about hazards and the techniques they can use to protect themselves and their property.  Examples include outreach projects, school education programs, library materials and demonstration events.

Actions that help residents build and maintain relationships with each other (especially neighbors), create shared plans, and develop shared resources to jointly prepare for, withstand, and recover from hazards.

Actions that involve the modification of existing buildings to protect them from a hazard or removal from the hazard area.  Examples include acquisition, relocation, elevation, structural retrofits, and storm shutters.

Actions intended to lessen the impact of a hazard by modifying the natural progression of the hazard.  Examples include dams, levees, detention/retention basins, channel modification, retaining walls and storm sewers.

Administrative or regulatory actions that influence the way land is developed and buildings are built.  Examples include planning and zoning, building codes, open space preservation, and floodplain regulations.


COMMUNICATIONS


DEMOGRAPHICS

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